Editation restores the heart. The effect of medication on reducing stress and helping lower blood pressure and insulin resistance

The effect of medication on reducing stress and helping lower blood pressure and insulin resistance.

Coronary heart disease is been associated with inflammation in the body. When this occurs, it gives us a good indication that the body is very disgruntled. Stress is one of those triggering causes creating this inflammatory recreation. The adrenal become exhausted and this also sets up insulin resistance, due to the effect of stress on blood sugar (hypoglycemia – a precursor to insulin residence)

A recent study shows that transcendental meditation (TM) may help patients with established heart disease. 103 coronary heart disease patients were assigned either weekly TM practice or health education classes for 16 weeks. Researchers discovered that TM was associated with the benefits of lowered systolic blood pressure, reduced insulin resistance and significantly improved heart rate variability, whereas the health education group did not.3 These results indicate that, whilst TM is not an alternative to medical therapy, it is a potentially helpful complementary strategy.

To learn more about other ways to improve your health and to discover detailed protocols for obtaining health, please contact our professional Naturopathic Practitioner at:

A Natural Self, A Naturopathy Clinic
Dana Kington
Naturopath
244 South Tce
South Fremantle, 6162
Perth

At this natural clinic, you will find all the latest technology, such as Toxicity and Heavy Metal Testing, Live Blood Analysis (Hemaview), and Iridology. We also treat with all forms of Natural Medicine with the nutritional supplementation of Homeopathy, Western Herbs, Chinese medicine, Vitamins, Minerals, Amino acids and Enzyme Therapy.

References

3. Paul-Labrador M, Polk D, Dwyer JH, et al. Effects of a randomized controlled trial of transcendental meditation on components of the metabolic syndrome in subjects with coronary heart disease. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166:1218-1224.